IT Support for New Brunswick Small and Mid-sized Businesses

NetAdmins provides enterprise-class IT services & tech support to New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and PEI small and mid-sized businesses. We manage every part of your IT, so you can focus on what you do best—running your business.

Partnering with NetAdmins is like having an entire IT support department at your disposal, whenever you need it. With a range of services including IP telephony (VoIP), email and web hosting, data back ups, paperless document management, security audits and 24-hour IT helpdesk, New Brunswick businesses can count on us as their only stop for business IT solutions.

On top of our à la carte offerings, we also provide comprehensive Managed IT Services in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia & PEI—including unlimited onsite and remote IT support, so you have a constant hedge against IT disasters. Our skilled computer technicians in New Brunswick maintain your business IT systems, keeping them in top shape, and minimizing downtime.

We make sure your managed IT services in New Brunswick are stronger and more secure so your users can be more productive and focused on your core business—always at a savings to your bottom line.

Contact us today to learn more about our Managed IT Service plans or our range of expert IT and communication services.

Understanding Autocomplete with Microsoft Excel

Thanks to Allen Wyatt.

Excel includes a handy time-saving feature called AutoComplete. This feature can save you time when you are entering lots of similar information in a column. You may already have noticed this feature before—when you start to type something in a cell, Excel tries to guess what you are typing and shows a “match” that you can accept simply by pressing Enter.

The “matches” that Excel uses in its “guess” is nothing but the contents of the cells in the column, above where you are making your entry. For instance, if you have information in cells A1 through A6 and you are entering a value in cell A7, Excel looks at what you are typing. If the first few characters uniquely match something in any of the six cells previously entered in the column, then Excel offers to AutoComplete A7 with the contents of the cell that matched.

Excel only tries to match your new entry with immediately adjacent cells above the one in which you are entering the information. It stops trying to match entries when a blank cell is reached. For instance, suppose you have information in cells A1 through A14 and A16 through A23. When you start typing an entry in cell A24, Excel only tries to match it with values in A16 through A23; the blank cell at A15 halts the comparisons.

Continue Reading